Mondyboy

Author's details

Name: Ian Mond
Date registered: October 15, 2011
URL: http://mondyboy.com

Latest posts

  1. Record of a Night Too Brief by Hiromi Kawakami — March 23, 2017
  2. The Intrusions by Stav Sherez — March 22, 2017
  3. The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill — March 21, 2017
  4. Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough — March 21, 2017
  5. The Book of Etta by Meg Elison — March 17, 2017

Most commented posts

  1. Number crunching 10 year of the Ditmars — 29 comments
  2. Hugo Commentary: Best Fan Writer (long post – tangents included) — 23 comments
  3. Some Brief Thoughts on the Aurealis Awards Nominations — 22 comments
  4. Hugo Thoughts (Part Three) — 18 comments
  5. Gender Bias, Case Number #219067 — 15 comments

Author's posts listings

Mar 23

Record of a Night Too Brief by Hiromi Kawakami

Record of a Night Too Brief by Hiromi Kawakami is a collection of three novelettes which, according to the back cover blurb, won the Akutagaw Prize in 1996. This is their first translation and publication in English by the wonderful Pushkin Press who continue to bring fascinating, offbeat translated work to the public. The opening …

Continue reading »

Mar 22

The Intrusions by Stav Sherez

I can’t remember the last time I read a book as genuinely twisty-turny and as gripping as The Intrusions by Stav Sherez. It’s the third novel in the crime fighting adventures of Detectives Jack Carrigan and Geneva Miller but don’t let that put you off. Yes this book references events from the previous books, specifically …

Continue reading »

Mar 21

The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill

I did not like The Lonely Hearts Hotel by Heather O’Neill. That’s an understatement. I found the book to be annoying, miserable and nihilistic. Anyone else would have put the novel down after 50 pages, maybe at the point where an 11-year-old boy is repeatedly raped by a nun, or a girl is beaten black …

Continue reading »

Mar 21

Behind Her Eyes by Sarah Pinborough

This is one of those psychological thrillers of the waiting for the penny to drop variety. I’ve actually read Pinborough’s work before, a forgettable Torchwood novel, and would have passed this one by if not for a decent write-up in the New York Times. Even without that review I might have read the book anyway …

Continue reading »

Mar 17

The Book of Etta by Meg Elison

I loved The Book of the Unnamed Midwife. It was raw and unfiltered, uniquely exploring the issue of female reproductive rights in the middle of an apocalypse. I loved it so much that after reviewing it on my blog I suggested the book to Kirstyn for The Writer and the Critic podcast. I then applauded …

Continue reading »

Mar 15

Norse Mythology by Neil Gaiman

I struggled to figure out the point of this book. I understand that Gaiman has a love for the Norse myths, but this project, which essentially re-writes those myths with a Gaiman gloss, seems indulgent to me. Not that I’m familiar with the source material (the Edda), but from what I could tell from a …

Continue reading »

Mar 14

Follow Me Into the Dark by Felicia C. Sullivan

Follow Me Into the Dark opens with thirty-something Kate setting aflame the hair of her step-father’s mistress Gillian. It’s possibly the least fucked-up thing to happen in the novel. In 2013 Felicia C. Sullivan wrote a memoir about her childhood. I’ve not read the book but if the back cover copy is anything to go …

Continue reading »

Mar 13

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin

Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin (translated by Megan McDowell) is the best horror novella / work of fiction of the year. Am I calling it early? Abso-fucking-lutely. The opening of the novella not only sets the scene but almost immediately induces a level of tension that shouldn’t be possible so early in the piece. A woman – …

Continue reading »

Mar 11

The Refugees by Viet Thanh Nguyen

Nguyen won the Pulitzer Prize last year for his début novel, The Sympathiser. The Refugees is his first collection of short fiction and it is truly magnificent. The title is a clear enough indication of what to expect – stories about the refugee experience – except that Nguyen provides a variety of point of views …

Continue reading »

Mar 10

Universal Harvester by John Darnielle

Iowa in the late 1990s and a video store clerk – Jeremy – is made aware by the local schoolteacher – Stephanie – that her copy of Targets – a Corman / Bogdonavich film starring Boris Karloff which I’ve never seen but heard a shitload about via Gilbert Gottfried’s podcast – has been tampered with. …

Continue reading »

Older posts «